Myrmidon Access Points

To make affordable WLANs capable of handling the large numbers of connections and high throughput most of us anticipate, I would like two classes of access point. The smart access points that we already have would work with many more much simpler and therefore much cheaper myrmidon access points that make most of the connections and shift most of the data. These two classes of access point must occupy the same space so that the advantages of each are always available.
To be cheap enough to be deployed in large numbers myrmidons must be very simple, specialising only in high numbers of connections and / or high throughput. Ideally they should also be small and use little power, but importantly they should require no individual human configuration or attention. As they need to coexist in the same space as smart Wi-Fi based APs they would be advantaged in using out-of-band wireless technologies like 802.11ad / WirelessHD / WiGig, DASH7, Zigbee, and Li-Fi. The sophistication they need but lack is delegated to specialised proximate controller devices. Each controller will orchestrate the configuration and behaviour of large numbers of myrmidons according to localised conditions and usage patterns, and in anticipation of events.
Right now I would like to be installing myrmidons. Desks are an obvious place, but the lower price of this capability enables it to be installed in many more locations. For example, it would be much more affordable to fit out large venue halls, sports stadiums, and outdoor locations such as car parks and playgrounds. It would also help low margin businesses such as mainstream hotels and high street shops to offer a better wireless connectivity experience. As the internet-of-things, low cost robotics, WPANs, BANs, wearables, and wireless sensors become more common so we will need this kind of WLAN.

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Update

This Wilocity chips sounds like a potential candidate to enable the client side connection to myrmidons

Wireless sensors are coming

The Dash7 Alliance promotes the ISO 18000-7 standard for wireless sensor networking.
On 2013-09-25 it announced the public release of the first version of the DASH7 Alliance Protocol.
Low implementation costs will be important in its competition with Zigbee.
Operating at a lower frequency DASH7 has an inherent range advantage but lower throughput.
Dash7 also specifies lower power usage than Zigbee but lesser security features.
Although Zigbee and Dash7 have overlapping applications their different characteristics should allow both to find a niche.